LIED DER MOORSOLDATEN

Latest update on 21/10/2020

Artist: Ernst Busch
Author: Johan Esser/Wolfgang Langhoff/Rudi Goguel
Label: Sov Song
Year: 1936

The authors were prisoners in Börgermoor, one of fifteen Elmslanderlager, opened following the burning of the Reichstag in '33 to concentrate German 'subversive elements' (see footnote). Hans Eisler heard the song in London in 1935 and arranged the music for singer Ernst Busch (recorded in Moscow). Dutch translation ('35): Henk Wielek. Later versions as Wir sind die Moorsoldaten. There's also a French version as Le Chant des marais.

Covers:

1942:

Paul Robeson [as Peat Bog Soldiers]

1960:

Theodore Bikel [idem]

1961:

Pete Seeger [idem]

1962:

Ian Campbell

1966:

Chad Mitchell Trio

1970:

Dubliners

1972:

Mouloudji [as Le Chant des marais]

1974:

Jaap van de Merwe [as De Moorbrigade; own lyrics]

1975:

Rum [as De Moorsoldaten]

1989:

Black Family

1990s:

Jan Van Calsteren [as De Veensoldaten]

2017:

Toten Hosen

2017:

Lankum [as Peat Bog Soldiers]

After thirteen months at the Börgermoor prison camp, Wolfgang Langhoff was released, escaped to Switzerland and turned his Moorsoldaten diary notes into a book. It was published before the war began. Langhoff tells about a circus session set up by the prisoners to cheer up each other. Showstopper was the song of the Veensoldaten (or Börgermoorlied), sung by all prisoners and SS-janitors alike. Two days later that song was banned for its hopeful last refrain. The song was smuggled outside and made it just in time on the repertoire of Spanish Civil War partizans. Melody also used for Lied Van De Vierde Wereld (Vlaams Vierde Wereld Syndicaat).

Contact


If you noticed blunt omissions, mis-interpretations or even out-and-out errors, please let us know by contacting us:

Arnold Rypens
Rozenlaan 65
B-2840 Reet (Rumst)

info@originals.be

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