I BE'S TROUBLED

Latest update on 30/07/2015

Artist: Muddy Waters
Author: McKinley Morganfield
Label: Library Of Congress
Year: 1941

Among the first songs he recorded, for Alan Lomax, who came to his hut on Stovall's Plantation (near Clarksdale, MS), where Muddy (real name: McKinley Morganfield) drove a tractor. He'd never seen a good guitar before Alan handed him his own. Based on a worksong and his slide was influenced by Son House. Once in Chicago in 1948 he recorded it again as I Can't Be Satisfied (for Aristocrat). Original reissued on Testament-lp Down On Stovall's Plantation and Chess cd The Complete Plantation Recordings. In the interview that goes with these first recordings Muddy claims he seldom had the blues, least of all while playing the blues.

Covers:

1942:

McKinley Morganfield [as I Be Bound To Write To You during a second Lomax session, same place, one year later; with Charles Berry on second guitar]

1948:

Muddy Waters [as I Can't Be Satisfied; Evelyn Aron, Leonard Chess's partner in the Aristocrat label (pre Chess) was more supportive]

1965:

Rolling Stones [idem; in the same year as their own I Can't Get No Satisfaction]

1976:

Hot Tuna

1981:

Blues Band

1984:

Dr. Feelgood

1991:

George Thorogood

1992:

Ray Stubbs

1993:

Rhythm Oil

1993:

Paul Rodgers

1993:

Dave Hole

1995:

Willy DeVille [all as I Can't Be Satisfied]

1998:

Johnny Farmer [as Trouble Me]

1999:

Dave MacKenzie [as I Can't Be Satisfied]

2001:

Harry Manx [idem]

2001:

Dale Watson [idem]

2005:

Elliott Murphy [idem]

2008:

Paul Jones & Dave Kelly [idem]

2009:

Guy Davis [idem]

2011:

Gregg Allman [idem]

2011:

Steve Miller Band [idem]

2015:

Joe Bonamassa [idem]

The one room shack Muddy lived in on Stovall's farm was blown to pieces by a tornado, just when plans were underway to move it plank by plank to the Delta Blues Museum in nearby Clarksdale. One plank was used to carve the so-called Muddywood guitar, once used by ZZ-Top, now on permanent display inside the wooden walls of Muddy's hut in that same Clarksdale museum. There's a green snake in the form of the Mississippi river, running all over its white body.

Contact


If you noticed blunt omissions, mis-interpretations or even out-and-out errors, please let us know by contacting us:

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info@originals.be

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