CLARINET GET AWAY

Latest update on 12/08/2014

Artist: Jimmy O'Bryant's Washboard Band
Author: Jimmy O'Bryant
Label: Paramount
Year: 1925

Bandleader from Arkansas with short stints with Jelly Roll Morton, W.C. Handy and King Oliver up his sleeve, while in Chicago he accompanied Ida Cox, Alberta Hunter, Ma Rainey and Ethel Waters. His 'band' here is a four-piece, with him on clarinet, author Jimmy Blythe on piano, Bob Shoffner on cornet and indeed Jasper Taylor on washboard.

Covers:

1930:

Wingy Manone [as Tar Paper Stomp]

1930:

Barbecue Joe & His Hot Dogs [as Tar Paper Rag; alias for Joseph 'Wingy' Manone; used this alias when recording for Gennett]

1931:

Fletcher Henderson [as Hot 'n' Anxious with the Baltimore Bell Hops]

1932:

Don Redman [idem]

1935:

Mills Blue Rhythm Band [as There's Rhythm In Harlem, written by Joe Garland who played sax in an all black band under Lucky Millinder]

1938:

Edgar Hayes [first time as In The Mood; with Joe Garland for Decca]

1939:

Glenn Miller [idem; n°1 US]

1939:

Al Donahue [idem; first sung version; vocal by Paula Kelly; lyrics by Andy Razaf]

1939:

Artie Shaw [idem]

1941:

Teddy Wilson

1952:

Andrews Sisters

1955:

Perez Prado

1959:

Ernie Fields [Top 5 US]

1960:

Jerry Lee Lewis [under alias The Hawk]

1962:

René & The Alligators

1964:

Shadows

1974:

Mud

1976:

Matchbox

1977:

Ray Stevens [alias Henhouse Five Plus Two; hit UK & US]

1982:

Bette Midler

1983:

Stars On 45 [as The Star Sisters in Andrews Sisters-medley; n°1 B & NL]

1989:

Jive Bunny

2000:

Brian Setzer

2006:

Puppini Sisters [all as In The Mood]

In The Mood is not a Glenn Miller original to begin with. It was written by Joe Garland and Andy Razaf. Edgar Hayes was the first to record it with his orchestra in '38. This is only the first step back in time: even before the tune was called In The Mood, the famous clarinet riff was already in place. Don Redman used it clearly at the beginning of his Hot 'n Anxious in '32 and one-armed trumpeter Wingy Manone in his Tar Paper Stomp from '29. According to Leonard Feather, jazz critic extraordinaire, Wingy's the bottomline for that opening riff. Apparantly he wasn't aware of this prehistoric rendition of the In The Mood clarinet line throughout Jimmy O'Bryant's mid-twenties recording. All of these semi-obscure Glenn Miller precursors were black.

Contact


If you noticed blunt omissions, mis-interpretations or even out-and-out errors, please let us know by contacting us:

Arnold Rypens
Rozenlaan 65
B-2840 Reet (Rumst)

info@originals.be

No Facebook No Twitter