THAT'S ALL RIGHT

Latest update on 20/03/2013

Artist: Arthur Crudup
Author: Arthur Crudup
Label: RCA Victor
Year: 1946

Original title: I Don't Know It. Three years later the first blues/R&B on a 45 (red vinyl). Slightly influenced by Son House's My Black Mama (see there), lyrically connected (slightly) with Blind Lemon Jefferson's That Black Snake Moan ('26), Little Brother Montgomery's Something Keeps A-Worryin' Me ('36) and Louis Jordan's It's A Low-Down Dirty Shame ('42). Arthur Crudup was a semi-pro: sharecropper in Mississippi, musician in Chicago. There, like all bluesmen, he was exploited by Lester Melrose. Nothing changed when Hill & Range (Elvis' publishing company) came in charge since Elvis cut four of his songs.

Covers:

1954:

Elvis Presley [as That's All Right Mama; the perfect synthesis of R&B, C&W, gospel and pop; less lyrics than Crudup]

1954:

Marty Robbins [just like Elvis; his version sold national and ranked higher]

1957:

Little Junior Parker

1959:

Ray Smith

1959:

Ral Donner

1962:

Rockers [as C'est d'accord maman]

1963:

Beatles [BBC recording]

1968:

Mike Bloomfield & Al Kooper

1969:

Albert King

1970:

Scott Dunbar

1970:

Albert Lee

1971:

Rod Stewart

1972:

Jimmy Ellis [with Blue Moon Of Kentucky on the B-side and on Sun, freshly sold to Shelby Singleton; sounds like Elvis and was first released without any name on the label]

1977:

Slade

1977:

Waylon Jennings

1979:

Hank C. Burnette [instrumental]

1985:

Jesse Garon [as Tout va très bien maman]

1988:

Paul McCartney [on his Russian lp]

1992:

Vince Gill [in film Honeymoon In Vegas]

1993:

Danny Gatton [in medley]

1996:

Junior Wells

2000:

Guido Belcanto [as It's Alright Mama]

2004:

Stray Cats

2005:

Cheyenne Jackson [in Broadway musical All Shook Up]

2005:

Tyler Hilton [in Johnny Cash biopic Walk The Line]

2008:

T-Model Ford

2008:

Green Day

2009:

Bill Frisell

A-side of Presley's first Sun single, the song that convinced Sam Phillips and soon a whole babyboom generation with him. After all, this was the first non-ballad he sang in that tiny studio. Sam was utterly baffled when this white kid suddenly uttered this uptempo country-blues rendition of a song written by a black man from Belzoni, MS. Elvis who was raised in that same state, in a '56 interview: "The coloured folks been singing it and playing it just like I'm doing now, man, for more years than I know. They played it like that in the shanties and juke joints and nobody paid it no mind 'till I goosed it up. I got it from them. Down in Tupelo, MS I used to hear old Arthur Crudup bang his box the way I do now and I said if I ever go to the place I could feel what old Arthur felt, I'd be a music man like nobody ever saw".

Contact


If you noticed blunt omissions, mis-interpretations or even out-and-out errors, please let us know by contacting us:

Arnold Rypens
Rozenlaan 65
B-2840 Reet (Rumst)

info@originals.be

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