JUNCO PARTNER (WORTHLESS MAN)

Latest update on 02/05/2010

Artist: James 'Wee Willie' Wayne
Author: Robert Shad
Label: Sittin' In With
Year: 1951

It's almost a miracle we actually know this is a James Wayne song, for he was locked away in a madhouse for arson. All the while his royalties went in someone else's pockets, not to mention the shrewd and obscure labelboss Bob Shad, who signed for as many of Wayne's compositions he could lay hands on. Here's poor James in his mental institution claiming authorship to anyone he bumps in to. No-one around believes he wrote famous songs, millionsellers that is! Any time James came up with that same routine, he was administred another manic depression pill to ease down his presumed delusions of grandeur. In the end James Wayne was like the local Napoleon. Then finally he was entitled to petition to be bailed out, was assigned a public defender and it was this Mort Borenstein who finally came to realize his client really wrote all of these songs, that he really was entitled to years of unacounted royalties, that he wasn't even sick in his head or anything. Count it out: Junco Partner had been recorded by Louis Jordan and Dr. John, later also by The Clash, The Dirty Dozen Brass Band, John Hammond, Michael Bloomfield, John Mooney, Harry Connick Jr., James Booker, Warren Zevon & three quarter REM. On the original Sittin' In With single James' name is spelled Waynes. See also: Travelin' Mood and Tend To Your Business.

Covers:

1951:

Professor Longhair

1952:

Louis Jordan

1957:

Huey Smith

1960:

Roland Stone [singer in Mac Rebennack's band as Down The Road]

1964:

Holy Modal Rounders

1969:

Eric Von Schmidt

1970:

John Hammond

1972:

Dr. John [on Gumbo lp]

1973:

James Booker

1980:

Clash [on Sandinista!]

1983:

Roland & Friends

1984:

Willie Egan

1984:

Mike Bloomfield

1987:

Diz Watson

1990:

Hindu Love Gods [Warren Zevon & REM minus Michael Stipe]

1993:

John Mooney

2001:

Harry Connick Jr.

2002:

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

The junkies' anthem in New Orleans and in the Louisiana State Pen (Angola). "Six months ain't no sentence, one year ain't no time, they got boys there in Angola doing nine to ninety-nine." See also: Junker's Blues. Six Months Ain't No Sentence is also the title of an anonymous field recording Lawrence Gellert made in the thirties, ending up on lp Nobody Knows My Name: Blues From South Carolina And Georgia (Heritage-label).

Contact


If you noticed blunt omissions, mis-interpretations or even out-and-out errors, please let us know by contacting us:

Arnold Rypens
Rozenlaan 65
B-2840 Reet (Rumst)

info@originals.be

No Facebook No Twitter