IN THE PINES

Latest update on 11/03/2016

Artist: Dock Walsh
Author: traditional
Label: Columbia
Year: 1926

Pre Carolina Tar Heels. Reissued in '68 on lp Ballads And Breakdowns Of The Golden Era.

Covers:

1927:

Tenneva Ramblers [as The Longest Train I Ever Saw; during the Bristol Sessions]

1934:

Convicts of Bellwood Prison Camp, Atlanta, GA [idem; Lomax recording]

1935:

J.E. Mainer's Mountaineers [idem]

1938:

Riley Puckett [idem]

1939:

Fiddlin' Arthur Smith [idem]

1940:

Lead Belly [as Where Did You Sleep Last Night; maybe overheard the Lomax recording as their chauffeur in '34]

1941:

Bill Monroe

1947:

Lead Belly [as Black Girl]

1949:

Bascom Lamar Lunsford [as To The Pines, To The Pines]

1956:

Kossoy Sisters with Erik Darling

1956:

Louvin Brothers

1956:

Paul Clayton

1957:

Lonnie Donegan [as Black Girl]

1958:

Pete Seeger

1959:

Dave Van Ronk

1959:

Gene Vincent

1961:

Bob Dylan [as Where Did You Sleep Last Night]

1961:

Journeymen [as Black Girl]

1962:

New Christy Minstrels

1962:

Joan Baez

1965:

Sir Douglas Quintet [as It Was In The Pines]

1965:

Four Pennies [as Black Girl]

1965:

Marianne Faithfull [idem]

1965:

Roscoe Holcomb

1965:

Clifford Jordan [vocal: Sandra Douglass]

1966:

Shawn Phillips [idem]

1966:

Grateful Dead [as Where Did You Sleep Last Night]

1971:

Long John Baldry [idem]

1972:

Link Wray [as Georgia Pines]

1977:

Gene Clark

1982:

Doc Watson

1983:

Oak Ridge Boys

1986:

Blood On The Saddle

1986:

Triffids

1987:

Charlie Feathers

1987:

Laughing Gravy

1990:

Phil Gammutt

1990:

Mark Lanegan [singer of The Screaming Trees]

1992:

Blackeyed Susans

1993:

Nirvana [as Where Did You Sleep Last Night]

1993:

Billy Childish & The Blackhands [as Black Girl]

1999:

Snakefarm [idem]

2001:

Odetta

2003:

Hans Theessink [as My Girl]

2007:

Partchesz

2011:

Country Ladies [as My Girl, crediting Lead Belly]

2011:

Martin Simpson

2012:

Wandering [with Luther Dickinson]

2012:

Roland Van Campenhout [as Black Girl]

2016:

Loretta Lynn

Collected in 1917 by British musicologist Cecil Sharp with Miss Lizzie Abner in the Oneida School, Clay Co., KY. A Judith McCulloh compared some 160 versions of this song cluster in her unpublished Ph.D paper: In The Pines - The Melodic-Textual Identity Of An American Lyric Folk-Song Cluster, University of Indiana, 1970. Her conclusion: the song came from Georgia in the 1870's. The mingling of similar songs like The Longest Train, In The Pines, Reuben's Train, Train 45, Where Did You Sleep Last Night, Black Girl and 900 Miles are also discussed in Norm Cohen's book about trains: Long Steel Rail.

Contact


If you noticed blunt omissions, mis-interpretations or even out-and-out errors, please let us know by contacting us:

Arnold Rypens
Rozenlaan 65
B-2840 Reet (Rumst)

info@originals.be

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