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The Originals The Originals - Prequel of the hits

This ongoing search for the origins of all popular songs imaginable has been bundled in books over the years, four in Dutch, all sold out. Now here's a first edition in English, and the good thing is: you don't need those old versions, for all information still standing and relevant from former editions is encapsulated into this new volume, like Russian babooshka puppets.

The Originals - Prequel of the Hits holds everything, no less. Pure content. Details the lifespan of some 12.000 music titles, all traced back to their earliest manifestation, predating hit version(s) and other relevant covers.

The new book is available at www.epo.be.


The Originals

Through the years and backed up by an ever growing army of little helpers, The Originals managed to draw the real bloodlines of all songs that matter. Like the equivalent of what pop-genealogist Pete Frame represents for all bands that matter. It’s not so much the author to decide which one’s in or out, it’s the consecutive performers. Also, a popular song is not automatically in from the moment it’s being covered. Only when a cover is so successful the song might be associated with this new performance, the title is in. When a song might raise another performer, another timeframe or another genre than the original one, that’s when enlisting takes place and only then. It’s called The Originals here, not The Covers; nuance.

A cover in the literal sense of the word tries to obscure something and in doing so tries to de-route all attention to this new interpretation. In many cases such haughtiness is utterly futile, doomed to fail from the very beginning. The Bee Gees feat. Peter Frampton covering Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band gave them no ticket to ride. Long as monuments aren’t built on someone else’s shoulders, you won’t find them here. The more room there is to concentrate on real hidden treasures and triage survivors.

It started as a museum of curiosities, a freak show of songs with a former life, but through the years with covering taking unprecedented side loops and with more solid-looking foundations excavated, this body of work became more like a pirate’s map to the treasure groves companion. It’s the size, specification and accuracy that matters. Also, where most musical databases put the artist central stage, here it’s the repertoire; the song, not the singer. Sometimes it’s good to realize a good song is eternal, while singers come and go. Welcome in the Tower of Songs, right on top of the Pantheon of Performers.

Latest update on 18/10/2014 - © Arnold Rypens